Tagged Barnes & Noble Booksellers

Life after the junkyard: Sequel to “Wreath, A Girl” releases today!

My new novel, “Wreath, In Summer,” releases today, December 1, 2015, and I can’t wait for you to read it.

Wreath-In-SummerThis is the second novel in the Wreath Willis series, the sequel to “Wreath, A Girl.” I wrote it after hearing from readers who wanted to know what happened to Wreath after high-school graduation. Turns out, Wreath has lots of adventures ahead.

After high-school graduation, Wreath is ready for a summer of fun. However, a mysterious young stranger needs her help—causing her to make tough decisions and putting her in danger. Paperback and digital versions are available on Amazon.com, right here.

Wreath’s story is for readers of all ages, from age 11 through adulthood.

The comments of early readers have made me smile. A sampling:

“Wow! You have topped ‘Wreath, A Girl’ with the new book. The growth of Wreath is amazing. You’ve captured so well the problems of kids in that transition between high school and ‘real life’–be it college or work….It’s a wonderful story.” – From a Book Club Member and avid reader

“What an adventurous story, filled with twists and turns…If you loved ‘Wreath, A Girl,’ hang on for round two! Just when you thought Wreath’s biggest adventures were behind her, she enters into a summer filled with romantic twists, heart-pounding adventures, intrigue…highly recommended!” –Bestselling author Janice Thompson, who has written nearly 100 books

“I loved being part of Wreath’s summer before college…This is a wonderful YA story but also a great read for adults…because there are times when we all need someone to help us do the right thing. I sure hope there is more of this adventure to come!” New York Times bestselling author Lenora Worth

Hope you’ll read “Wreath, In Summer” soon. Haven’t read “Wreath, A Girl” yet or need a teen gift? You can order it in paperback or e-book here.

And please consider posting reviews of “Wreath, In Summer” and “Wreath, A Girl” on Amazon.com and Goodreads and spread the word to friends and family. Reviews are one of the nicest gifts you can give an author.

If you’re in the North Louisiana area, we’ll celebrate “Wreath, In Summer” with a launch party and book fair on Monday, December 7, 2015, 5 to 7:30 p.m. at Barnes & Noble in Shreveport. We’ll have refreshments and door prizes and visit about books! To give back to our community, B&N will give a portion of all sales to buy books and educational toys for children in need this Christmas–with the help of the wonderful Common Ground Community in the Cedar Grove neighborhood of Shreveport.

 

 

 

10 Reasons This Novelist Is Smiling

Here’s the thing: I’m a not-famous, middle-aged Southern storyteller who has never made the New York Times bestseller list and who still works another job. My office is a wreck this week.photo 1 - Copy (8)

My name didn’t shoot up on the Amazon “Movers & Shakers” list when my eighth novel released, I haven’t been interviewed by NPR or CNN, and I wish that new top I bought was more slimming.

But I’m smiling.

The professional book world is full of frowns about the future of publishing, but perhaps it has taken its eye off that most wonderful of gifts: readers.

As a novelist and book columnist for the local newspaper, I experience every day a zest for books from readers of varied ages and professions and geography, ordinary folks who appreciate books, who yearn for good stories, who are generous with their time and money and encouragement. Who love to talk about books. Who feel passionately about what they like–and don’t like–to read.

Want to know what makes a good book? Ask a reader.photo 2 - Copy (9)

With the launch of “Magnolia Market,” I was reminded again that writing novels is all about you, the reader. Partaker of stories. Dissector of plots. Appreciator of words. Encourager of sometimes-anxious authors who wonder if anyone will read their new books.

Many readers celebrated the new novel with me in person (see photos for a taste of launch-party fun) and online. You give me numerous reasons to smile, and this list comes with a confession:

I love people who love books.

10 Things That Make Me Smile

1. Visiting. Being a writer, a seemingly solitary profession, brings me together with smart, funny, generous people. In a world torn apart over many issues, books unite us. People from all phases of my life pop up—from childhood friends to people I’ve only recently met.

2. Book-club cheerleaders. Several clubs were represented at the launch of “Magnolia Market,” including members of the East Texas chapter of Pulpwood Queens, who drove 50 miles for the party. Each of these clubs is filled with readers who have calmed my nerves on this writing journey.photo 4 - Copy (6)Magnolia Market Launch Party 2photo 3 - Copy (7)

3. Librarians. It’s a special honor when people who have worked around shelves of books all day take time to come by and celebrate or to recommend my books to patrons (a fancy word for “readers).

4. The realization that the joy of reading crosses all ages—from 3-year-old great-nephew Truett to Miss Mamie, well into her nineties and excited to win the “I  Books” mug door prize.

5. Early morning emails on release day from around the country saying pre-ordered e-copies arrived. Everyone’s busy as the day begins, right? And yet readers take time to say, “It’s here!” A small gesture that packs a lot of emotion.

6. The blogger who wanted me to know that her 5-star review posted on Amazon the day the book came out. Reviews shouldn’t matter, but they do. The number of Amazon and Goodreads reviews help authors. Thank you for taking time to post a paragraph.

7.Early feedback from readers who stayed up late to finish the book the day they got it–and emailed to ask about the next book in the Trumpet and Vine series. Big smile. (And will Kathleen and Avery’s father get together? Stay tuned.)Magnolia Market final cover 10.24.13

8. Presents. Yes, presents. Here I am, asking readers to give up time and money, and they bring gifts—from homemade
fudge to a smiley-face balloon and cute notepad to a “Yay! Books!” magnet. Amazing.

9. Bookstores that offer a place for readers to gather and celebrate, with a special smile for the Shreveport, Louisiana, Barnes & Noble, a friend to authors and the community.

10. The folks out there promoting reading and literacy. Volunteers from Common Ground, a nonprofit that helps improve literacy in a poor urban neighborhood, gave hours of their time to tell readers about their efforts at my launch party. In turn, readers donated educational items and B&N offered a percentage of sales for this cause.

Worried about the future of books? Not me! Readers will see us through—and for that, I smile and say thanks.

What do you think about the future of books? Leave a comment for a chance to win a signed copy of “Magnolia Market” and my favorite small “Read” notebook from a bookstore in Denver. I’ll draw at noon CST on Oct. 1.

P.S. If you haven’t picked up a copy yet, hope you’ll take a look: http://www.amazon.com/Magnolia-Market-Trumpet-Vine-Christie-ebook/dp/B00H6XM2NC/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&sr=&qid=
Magnolia Market promo banner

With love from a book launch

Judy at book signing Sept 24 2013The work of a writer is often solitary, months spent putting nouns and verbs together, inventing towns and making up people to talk to.

Then book-launch week arrives, and that sometimes lonesome life goes very public. The nervous author and the brand-new book jump into the world, ready for readers to have a look.

This experience, I confess, is both exhilarating and terrifying, filled with so much fun and a frightful case of nerves. These are the intense days when I hope extra much that a story I love will find its way into the hearts of readers.Louisiana cookies photo

Last week was launch week for “Sweet Olive,” my seventh novel, and I owe gratitude to so many of you–readers, family, friends, my publisher (Zondervan), booksellers, other writers and my terrific agent. The success of a book depends on the kindness of many, and I am richly blessed.

When I became an author, I decided that every book deserved a party–refreshments, prizes and an out-and-out celebration. I intended it as a thank you to readers, but it has become a time when readers enrich my life in ways even chatty me finds hard to describe.

The “Sweet Olive” party was held at the Shreveport Barnes & Noble Booksellers and included a book fair for Common Ground Community, a nonprofit in a North Louisiana neighborhood, an opportunity to share the joy of books with others. More than 100 guests came to greet “Sweet Olive,” and we made lots of noise as we laughed and visited. We ate  cookies shaped like Louisiana to celebrate fiction with a Louisiana flavor (see photo) and drew for prizes that included a sweet olive shrub.

To celebrate with blog visitors and other online readers, I collected an assortment of prizes, from pralines to an iron fleur d’lis to locally-made Camellia Coffee to signed copies of “Sweet Olive” and drew from your comments. Readers from all over the country won.

When I write a novel, I hole up for a while (I didn’t leave my neighborhood for nine days in August while finishing my next novel). When I read a book, I burrow up on the green couch, savoring quiet time.

But books are public as well as private. We recommend the ones we like. We collect them and show them off in bookcases in our homes. And we gather with authors to celebrate.

That fills my heart and makes me eager to sit down and start that solitary walk again. Thank you, all, for making the launch of “Sweet Olive” such a sweet time.

photo-6Have you ever been to a book-signing or to hear an author speak? What led you to do so? Are books public or private to you? Leave a comment for a chance to win a signed copy of “Sweet Olive.” I’ll draw at noon CST on Friday, Oct. 18. If you’re interested in reading,”Sweet Olive,” here’s more info:http://judychristie.com/sweet-olive.html